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Governor Running Out Of Time On Location Tracking Regulation

Time is running out on Governor Bruce Rauner to act on a bill that would change the way websites track a user's location and how they store that data.

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Trending Stories

Monticello CUSD 25

Despite New Funding Formula, Some Schools Lose

One promise heard repeatedly during debate over the Illinois’ new school funding plan was "no red numbers," meaning any legislation that would make a district lose money was dead on arrival. Last month, in a rare bipartisan compromise, lawmakers approved a new plan that contained “hold-harmless” protection.

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Statehouse

With Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan's announcement last week that she won't be running for re-election, hopefuls are lining up to run.  Opposition is building against Cook County's controversial soda tax.  And Governor Bruce Rauner is promoting Illinois as a great location for Amazon's new headquarters.

Rick Pearson of the Chicago Tribune and the State Journal-Register's Bernie Schoenburg join the panel.

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Education Desk

Can Teaching Civics Save Democracy?

4 hours ago

Young adults are losing faith in American Democracy and have difficulty distinguishing between "fake news" and reliable news. That's according to a new research paper out from Tufts University.

The solution? Support civic learning programs in K-12 education at the state and local level, the researchers argue.

"We know that if you study civics in high school you are more likely to be an informed voter," says Peter Levine, co-author of the paper and an associate dean for research at Tufts.

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Health+Harvest Desk

Cattle pass a lot of gas, and the methane from their flatulence and especially, their belches, is an expanding burden on the planet. The greenhouse gas has a warming potential 25 times that of carbon dioxide.

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Equity

Last time I worshipped in a synagogue was Sept. 5, 2014. And I won't be going today.

That might surprise my friends, who put up with my bragging ad nauseam about how Jewish I am.

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Illinois Economy

SJ-R.com

Sean Crawford talks with State Journal-Register Business Editor Tim Landis.

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One of the unanswered questions for the public over Russia's attempts to break into election systems last year was which states were targeted. Today, states found out.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said earlier this year that it had evidence of Russian activity in 21 states but they failed to inform individual states whether they were among those targeted. Instead, DHS authorities say they told those who had "ownership" of the systems — which in some cases were private vendors or local election offices.

Installing solar panels on your home could become more expensive, depending on how President Trump responds to a decision Friday by the U.S. International Trade Commission.

The ITC found that low-cost, imported solar panels from China and other countries have hurt two domestic manufacturers. They are Georgia-based Suniva and Oregon-based SolarWorld.

President Trump is facing a decision on whether to extend the ban on travelers from six majority-Muslim nations from entering the U.S. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke this week sent to the White House her recommendations for "tough and tailored" security vetting, to replace the current ban, which expires Sunday.

Though the brunt of Hurricane Maria has left Puerto Rico, the island's water worries continue. On Friday afternoon, the National Weather Service reported that the Guajataca Dam in the northwest is "failing" causing flash flooding. Buses were trying to evacuate people from the area "as quickly as they can," the service said.

The Dam failure is causing flooding downstream on the Guajataca River.

A flash flood watch is also in effect for much of the island through Friday evening with continued rainfall.

Compounding Puerto Rico's devastation in the wake of Hurricane Maria is the fact that so much is still unknown. Because most of the island's cellphone sites are out of service and the power grid is down, it has been difficult or impossible to connect with the people who live there — whether from the mainland or from another part of the island.

Atlanta resident Silkia Babilonia, who lives in Atlanta, says that since the storm, she hasn't been able to reach friends and family on the island's west side.

Iran unveiled a new ballistic missile Friday, showing off the weapon during a military parade in Tehran. "When it comes to defending our country, we will ask nobody for their permission," President Hassan Rouhani said.

John McCain on Friday imperiled Republicans' latest Affordable Care Act repeal and replace effort when he said he "cannot in good conscience" support the so-called Graham-Cassidy bill. But McCain did also say he could at some point support the substance of his fellow Republicans' proposal.

"I would consider supporting legislation similar to that offered by my friends Sens. [Lindsey] Graham and [Bill] Cassidy were it the product of extensive hearings, debate and amendment," McCain said. "But that has not been the case."

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2 hours ago

With guest host John Donvan.

A new push to replace the Affordable Care Act is afoot, and the heaviest debate over the legislation is between its sponsor, Senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, and late night TV host Jimmy Kimmel.

On Saturday the Catholic church will beatify a priest from Okarche, Oklahoma. Three assailants murdered the Rev. Stanley Rother in Guatemala in 1981 during that country’s civil war. Pope Francis declared last year that Rother is a martyr, setting the stage for him to possibly become a saint.

The United Nations General Assembly is in session this week, and the top question on many minds: How will President Trump’s “America First” message mesh with the rest of the world?

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson revisits some of the week’s speeches to see how world leaders are addressing that and other issues.

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A Glimpse Into the Underground - Art Show & Exhibit

On Tuesday, September 26th, join artists and public radio listeners at the WUIS/NPR Illinois station in Springfield, on the UIS Campus for an art opening and reception.

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Illinois Issues

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois Issues: A Master Of Compromise Exits

Former Illinois Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno reflects on her tenure.

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Illinois Issues Forums

WATCH-LISTEN: State Budget Forum - Macomb

NPR Illinois and Tri States Public Radio host the seventh Illinois Issues Forum on the state's financial health and the lasting impacts of the two-year-long state budget impasse.

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Politics

One of the unanswered questions for the public over Russia's attempts to break into election systems last year was which states were targeted. Today, states found out.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said earlier this year that it had evidence of Russian activity in 21 states but they failed to inform individual states whether they were among those targeted. Instead, DHS authorities say they told those who had "ownership" of the systems — which in some cases were private vendors or local election offices.

President Trump is facing a decision on whether to extend the ban on travelers from six majority-Muslim nations from entering the U.S. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke this week sent to the White House her recommendations for "tough and tailored" security vetting, to replace the current ban, which expires Sunday.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2 hours ago

With guest host John Donvan.

A new push to replace the Affordable Care Act is afoot, and the heaviest debate over the legislation is between its sponsor, Senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, and late night TV host Jimmy Kimmel.

For more than nine months, Twitter and Facebook have tried to dodge the intense public scrutiny involved with the investigation into Russian interference in last year's presidential election.

Now they're in the spotlight.

Congressional investigators are digging in on Russia's use of Facebook, Twitter and other social media companies to try to influence the 2016 campaign.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene in Culver City, Ca. And, Rachel Martin, I'm a little jealous. It sounds like you don't have a bad view this morning in Berlin.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Featured

Does Our Constitution Hold Up Today?

Was our Constitution made for this much economic inequality? One big thinker says no. It’s easy to forget just what a radical document the US Constitution was when it rolled out 230 years ago this week. Nothing like it in the world. Flawed, yes, with slavery enshrined. But far-sighted in many ways. One thing the framers of the constitution did not foresee, says my guest today, is radical economic inequality in the USA. They didn’t have a House of Lords and another for commoners. But here we...

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The X | 91.9-3 HD

U2, Ed Sheeran Cancel St. Louis Concerts After Protests Over Police Acquittal

Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET Like U2, Ed Sheeran has also canceled his concert in St. Louis because of safety concerns. The cancellations follow protests in the city prompted by the acquittal of a former police officer, who had been charged with first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of a black man. As NPR reported Friday, Jason Stockley, who is white, was found not guilty of murder in the 2011 killing of Anthony Lamar Smith. The verdict resulted in protests throughout St. Louis. According to...

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